A collection of the haunted ghost stories, urban legends, folktales and the paranormal of Japan.

Japan has a vast and old tradition of telling ghost stories. The old folk tales are kept alive in the many horror books and movies.

An Article Detailing the Different Ghosts of Japan

The Ghosts of Japan

In Japan, the ghosts are called Yūrei (幽霊). The word means faint or dim and soul or spirit. And as well as language and cultures divides different types of ghost in different categories, so does the Japanese. Here are some of the ghosts of Japan.

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Tomino’s Hell — The Cursed Poem

The supposedly cursed poem known as Tomino’s Hell has been a famous creepypasta for a long time and an urban legend before that. But what is the truth behind the dark and twisted poem? A popular Japanese urban legend is about Tomino’s Hell,トミノの地獄. It is a poem that is said you should only read in…

The Ghosts Of the Haunted Himeji Castle In Japan

Explore the supernatural stories of Japan’s Magnificent Haunted Himeji Fortress and find out why this iconic castle is said to be haunted by both monsters and tragic ghosts.

Kuchisake-onna – The Urban Legend of the Slit-Mouthed Woman

In the dimly lit alleys in urban Japan, a woman wearing a mask is terrorizing the children walking home from late school. When she reveals her carved up mouth, it’s over. Kuchisake-onna, or The Slit-Mouthed Woman will get her revenge.

O-shizu, Hitobashira — The Human Sacrifice of Maruoka Castle

Chosen as Hitobashira, a human sacrifice to ensure the construction of Maruoka Castle, O-shizu were promised a bright future for her children. But when the promise were not honoured, her ghost came back to haunt the castle grounds.

Okiku — The Haunted Doll of Hokkaido

The Okiku Doll, is a legend of a haunted doll from Japan were the hair of the doll is said to grow and is preserved in a temple looked after by monks. 

The Myth of Oiwa — The Paper Lantern Ghost

Once upon a time, there was a beautiful young woman who died. She went on a murderous rampage and she forever haunts the place of Yotsuya. The end.

Ghosts of the Tsunami

The tsunami disaster in 2011 left large parts of Japan in ruins. And some of the people never being found, are still trying to reach home it seems.

Botan Dōrō – Tales of the Peony Lantern

The Botan Dōrō or Tales of the Peony Lantern is a ghost story told since the Ming dynasty in China to today. Most popular through the Kaidan theater plays, it is now one of Japan’s most well known ghost stories.

Anime Horror Anthology Series

If you are tired of watching the reruns and reboots of the Halloween movies, take a look at what that has been coming out from Japan the last decade. Some are considered classics, some are fairly new, they should all help you get that tingly feeling of a scare. Here are five anime horror anthology…

Games to play in the dark

A collection of five games to play in the dark. Or not, depending how in touch with the spirits one feels.

The Obon Celebration – The Ghost Festival

Light your lanterns and get ready for The Ghost festival in Japan called The Obon Celebration. The festival, also known as Bon festival is a three day long festival each year in the late and hot summer to honor the dead.

Ju-On: Origins – a Look at the Truth Behind “the Grudge”

The new Netflix TV-series Ju-On: Origins gives a new spin on the franchise. From going from classical jump-scares to an actual social commentary installment.

Banchō Sarayashiki — the Ghost of Okiku

The tale of Banchō Sarayashiki (番町皿屋敷, The Dish Mansion at Banchō) is a well known Japanese ghost story (kaidan). It was popularized in the kabuki theater tradition, and lives on in popular culture and folklore alike.

Onryō — the Vengeful Japanese Spirit

In many cultures, ghosts are put in different categories. Such is the case with Onryō (怨霊 onryō,) It basically means “vengeful spirit” or “wrathful spirit” in Japanese and is a mythological spirit of vengeance from Japanese folklore. They also have ghosts, called yurei, but these differ in the will of the ghost. As opposed to…

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