This is a list of games that have been played for a long time, or new. Some are old in its new form. Many of these games are best played in the dark in the middle of the night, far from any other sounds. Some you are tired of, as we do with old games, some are always a welcomed suggestion to do.

Light as a Feather

This is a very old game. Or rather, more than a game, perhaps we would call it more of a party trick in these days. But it has been played as far back as in 1665, at least! It is still popular today, in modern day, most popularized by the books and HBO series by the same name.

The game is a circle of children (or adults, hey!) that invokes a spirit or something to lift someone lying down in the middle. When it works, it is af the child can lift their friend with only one finger.

Rules

One participant lies flat on the floor, and then the others space themselves around him or her, each placing one or two fingertips underneath the participant’s limbs. The person closest to the head commonly begins by saying, “She’s looking ill,” which is repeated several times, and followed by, “she’s looking worse,” which is also repeated several times. The general direction of the call-and-repeat describes how the prone person is looking worse and worse, followed by saying “she is dying,” and, finally, “she is dead”.

All versions of the game end with the phrase “light as a feather, stiff as a board” chanted by the entire group, as they attempt to lift their companion’s body using only their fingertips. Some versions omit the story entirely and only the “light as a feather…” chant is used. Allegedly, after these repetitions, the person being lifted will seem lighter or even entirely weightless.

Another variation of the game takes place with one person seated in a chair. Four volunteers agree to stand around the sitter, two on the sitter’s left side and the other two on his/her right. Each of the four places two fingers under each corner of the chair’s seat and the four together will attempt to lift the chair and sitter, which generally fails. The volunteers will then perform some small ritual, usually involving rubbing their hands together or circling the chair in various direction (counter-clockwise, walking backwards, etc.) After this ritual, the volunteers hold their hands over the sitter’s head to “transfer” energy into the sitter, which will presumably make him/her weightless. The lifters then retry lifting the sitter the same way as before. Also, it can be that the lifters lift the person sitting in the chair; doing the rest of the ritual as so but holding at the four main points of the body (Under the knees on each side and under the shoulders.)

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Bloody Mary

A classic tale, probably a bit boring if you have played it a million times. But the game is old and have been played in many different times. Perhaps one should try that? Perhaps it would work better then? Or… better not.

Historically, the divination ritual encouraged young women to walk up a flight of stairs backward holding a candle and a hand mirror, in a darkened house. As they gazed into the mirror, they were supposed to be able to catch a view of their future husband’s face. There was, however, a chance that they would see a skull instead, indicating that they were going to die before they would have the chance to marry.

In the ritual of today, Bloody Mary allegedly appears to individuals or groups who ritualistically invoke her name, repeatedly chanting her name into a mirror placed in a dimly-lit or candle-lit room. In some traditions the name must be repeated thirteen times (or some other specified number of times, very often 3 times in movies, probably to save time). The Bloody Mary apparition allegedly appears as a corpse, witch or ghost, can be friendly or evil, and is sometimes “seen” covered in blood. The lore surrounding the ritual states that participants may endure the apparition screaming at them, cursing them, strangling them, stealing their soul, drinking their blood. 

Some variations of the ritual call Bloody Mary by a different name—”Hell Mary” and “Mary Worth” are popular examples.

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The Hyakumonogatari Kaidan

This one is a pretty cool one. Although it excact origins are a bit unclear, it was believed that it was first played among the samurai class as a test of courage in old Japan.

The game was played as night fell upon the region using three separate rooms. In preparation, participants would light 100 lights in the third room and position a single mirror on the surface of a small table. When the sky was at its darkest, guests gathered in the first of the three rooms, taking turns orating tales of ghoulish encounters and reciting folkloric tales passed on by villagers who claimed to have experienced supernatural encounters. These tales soon became known as kaidan. Upon the end of each kaidan, the story-teller would enter the third room and extinguished one light, look in the mirror and make their way back to the first room. With each passing tale, the room slowly grew darker and darker as the participants reached the one hundredth tale, creating a safe haven for the evocation of spirits.

However, as the game reached the ninety-ninth tale, many participants would stop, fearful of invoking the spirits they had been summoning.

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Oujia Board

This is a rather facinating story of spiritualism, capitalism and a great scam that made people millions, and billions scared of a board game. But that must be another time. The game itself is pretty fun, even though people still swear of its demonic and spiritual powers. The official owner of the official Oujia Board is Hasbro, and this is the official rules from Hasbro (the owner of the patent).

Set up

  • If desired, set the mood by dimming the lights or turning them off.
  • Before using the Oujia Board, wipe it with a dry cloth to remove dust and moisture.
  • Sit opposite another player or gather around the board if more than two are playing.
  • Set the Ouija board either on the players laps or on a small table between and within reach of the players
  • Additional players are encouraged to look on and take note of the Oujia Board’s responses.
  • Set the Planchette in the center of the Oujia Board.
  • Place two fingers lightly on the Planchette.
  • Now, concentrate

What now?

Players take turns asking questions and all should agree to the question being asked. Ask only one question at a time. Ask your questions slowly and clearly. And wait to see what the Planchette spells out for you.

If nothing happens, try asking another question. Allow one to five minutes for an answer to come.

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The Midnight Game

Ok, so this one bugs me, and it thrills me. It has been a huge success and got its own movie, but still. Well, anyway, it claims to be a pagan ritual, not specifying though, what pagan religion considering every other religion beside the religion you follow is pagan. But anyway, considering it isn’t any trace of this game from before the 2010s, it is highly unlikely. But fun nonetheless. But there are a hell of lots rules, so we will just post them as they are written on the creepy pasta page so not to make any mistakes.

Instructions

PREREQUISITES:

It must be exactly 12:00 AM when you begin performing the ritual. Otherwise, it will not work.

MATERIALS:

You will need a candle, a piece of paper, a writing implement, matches or a lighter, salt, a wooden door, and at least one drop of your own blood. If you are playing with multiple people, they will need their own of the aforementioned materials and they will have to perform the steps below accordingly.

STEP 1:

Write your full name (first, middle, and last) on the piece of paper. Put at least one drop of blood on the paper. Allow it to soak into the paper.

STEP 2:

Turn off all of the lights in the place you are doing this. Go to your wooden door, and place the paper with your name on it in front of the door. Now, take out the candle and light it. Place it on top of the paper.

STEP 3:

Knock on the door twenty-two times. The hour must be 12:00 AM upon the final knock. Then, open the door, blow out the candle, and close the door. You have just allowed the “Midnight Man” to enter your house.

STEP 4:

Immediately relight your candle.
This is where the game begins. You must now lurk around your now completely dark house, with the lit candle in your hand. Your goal is to avoid the Midnight Man at all costs, until 3:33 AM. Should your candle ever go out, that means the Midnight Man is near you. You must relight your candle in the next ten seconds.

If you are not successful in doing this, you must then immediately surround yourself with a circle of salt. If you are unsuccessful in both of your actions, the Midnight Man will create a hallucination of your greatest fear, and rip out your organs one by one. You will feel it, but you will be unable to react.

If you are successful in creating the circle of salt, you must remain in there until 3:33 AM.
If you are successful in relighting your candle, you may proceed with the game. You must continue to 3:33 AM, without being attacked by the Midnight Man, or being trapped inside the circle of salt, to win the Midnight Game. The Midnight Man will leave your house at 3:33 AM, and you will be safe to proceed with your morning.

ADDITION:

Indications that you are near the Midnight Man will include sudden drop in temperature, seeing a pure black, humanoid figure through the darkness, and hearing very soft whispering coming from an indiscernible source. If you experience any of these, it is advised that you leave the area to avoid the Midnight Man.

DO NOT turn any of the lights on during the Midnight Game.

DO NOT use a flashlight during the Midnight Game.

DO NOT go to sleep during the Midnight Game.

DO NOT attempt to use another person’s blood on your name.

DO NOT use a lighter as a substitute for a candle. It will not work.

AND DEFINITELY DO NOT attempt to provoke the Midnight Man in ANY WAY.

Even when the game is over, he will always be watching you…

Good luck, you are going to need it.

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